Radio Station Tuner

A radio digital tuner receives radio signals by way of satellite and converts them into a signal that the radio can use.  A tuner is an adjustable device which passes some radio frequencies or band of frequencies, excluding others, by using electrical resonance.  A tuner performs the process of selecting the desired signal but its output is not directly usable and must be sent to another device.  Usually, tuners are sold with built-in audio amplifiers, loudspeakers, and/or a video display to form a radio receiver or television set.  These tuners can be either stereo or mono, and are available for TV, FM, AM and other types of radio signals.  The simplest of tuners only consists of an inductor and capacitor.  If the tuner is combined with a detector, also known as a demodulator, it becomes the simplest radio receiver, often called a crystal set.
Standalone audio stereo FM tuners are sought after for audiophile and TV/FM/DX applications, especially those produced in the 1970s and early 1980s, when performance and manufacturing standards were among the highest. In many instances the tuner may be modified to improve performance.  A growing hobby trend is the electronics specialists that buy, collect and restore these vintage FM or AM/FM audio tuners. The restoration usually begins with replacing the electrolytics (capacitors) that age over time. The tuner is outfitted with improved tolerance and better sounding upgraded parts. Prices have increased relative to the increasing demand for the older audio tuners.
Those with the most value are the best sounding, most rare (collectible), the best DX capable (Distance Reception) and the known build quality of the component, as it left the factory.
Most of the top end audio tuner models were designed and manufactured to receive only the FM broadcast band. As FM became more popular, the limitations of AM became more apparent, and the primary listening focus, especially for stereo and music broadcasting. The bulk of tuners made for the market, however, were AM/FM design, especially in the 1980's and 1990's. Few companies even manufacture dedicated FM or AM/FM tuners now, as these bands are most often included in a low cost chip for A/V systems, more as an afterthought, rather than designed for the critical FM listener. The FM aficionado must really look to the classic tuner models and either rebuild or upgrade the unit to satisfy demanding FM listeners. A few 1970s tuners feature now-deprecated Dolby noise reduction for FM broadcasts.
VHF/UHF TV tuners are rarely found as a separate component; however cable boxes serve as a separate tuner, and have channel 3/4 outputs so they can serve as a cable-ready emulator for TVs that aren't cable-ready, and often feature composite, S-video or component video outputs so they can be used on video monitors that do not have a TV tuner, or ones whose tuner is not working. They are usually bundled with a monitor, VCR and/or PVR. However, they do exist for use by members of the television industry, and may be purchased on Internet Auction Sites, such as eBay.

A radio tuner application is an application that enables a public radio station to be heard through the use of a radio tuner application.  The application is downloaded to some sort of media product allowing the capability to listen to many public radio stations via streaming.  Let’s discuss the various components involved in this application.
A tuner is an adjustable device which passes one radio frequency or band of frequencies by using electrical resonance.  It performs this process by selecting the desired signal.  Its output is not directly usable and must be sent to another device. Typically tuners are sold with built-in audio amplifiers, loudspeakers, and/or a video display to form a radio receiver or television set. Tuners can be either stereo or mono, and are available for TV, FM, AM, and other types of radio signals.  

Standalone audio stereo FM tuners were sought after for audiophile and TV/FM DX applications, especially those produced in the 1970s and early 1980s, when performance and manufacturing standards were among the highest.  The current tuners have been modified to improve performance.  One hobby trend is the electronics specialists that buy, collect and restore vintage FM or AM/FM audio tuners. The restoration usually begins with replacing the electrolytics (capacitors) that age over time. The tuner is outfitted with improved tolerance and better sounding upgraded parts. Prices have increased relative to the increasing demand for the older audio tuners. 

Streaming is defined as a one-way audio transmission over a data network.  It is widely used on the Internet as well as business networks to play audio clips and Internet radio. At-home computers in home stream audio for mostly music to digital media hubs connected to home theaters. Unlike sound files that are played after the entire file has been downloaded and stored, streaming audio begins playing after only a small amount is received, and the audio data are not stored permanently in the destination computer. 

If the streaming audio is broadcast live, then it may be called "real-time audio." However, technically, real time means no delays, and there is a built-in delay in streaming audio.

Listening to momentary lapses in music or a conversation can be annoying, and the only way to compensate for that over an erratic network such as the Internet is to get some of the audio data into the computer before you start listening to it. In streaming audio, both the client and the server cooperate for uninterrupted sound. The client side stores a few seconds of sound in a buffer before it starts sending it to the speakers. Throughout the session, it continues to receive audio data ahead of time.  A popular reason for having streaming of various radio or TV programs is so that there is no downloading of the audio onto business hard drivers, thereby causing disruptions and delays in service.  Where most businesses block such downloads, streaming is becoming a viable alternative.  Employees can listen to newscasts or television programs without having their access restricted because of employer IT concerns.